Wearable devices

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Kaminsky
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Wearable devices

Post by Kaminsky » Thu Oct 20, 2011 3:42 pm

One topic that gets kicked around a lot at cryonics meetings is that of wearable devices. The ideal device would be one that is small, lightweight, cheap, reliable, automatic, and avoids false-positives. The idea is to have a personal "On-Star" that monitors vital signs and calls for assistance when needed. Such a device could be a life-saver, or, at the very least, avoid a long postmortem delay in being found.

I know of nothing currently on the market that comes close to what is required. Has anyone heard of anything?

I was reminded of this because of an article in the Wall Street Journal:

A Device for When You're Hurt, Lost or Feeling Scared that discusses the 5Star Responder which is a push-button, key-chain, GPS device that allows a manual call to one of their operators (like the at-home, push-button product for the elderly, but in this case mobile); the operator can then either call emergency personal, connect you with a nurse, etc. It costs $50 plus a $15/month subscription. It's also available as iPhone app (with Android on the way). This device/app seems to be both more flexible than an emergency call (911), since it's usable in less-than-emergency situations (the example in the article was walking through an isolated parking lot at night), and also more useful in emergencies, since the operator will have your medical and contact info on file. An additional feature is one-button calling and, on the app, shake calling. In either case, silence will cause the operator to call police and direct them to your location.

Any thoughts on this? Are there similar or better products on the market?

bwowk
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Re: Wearable devices

Post by bwowk » Thu Oct 20, 2011 4:11 pm

Alcor is currently studying the feasibility of processing SMS text messages sent to their emergency number. Many electronic devices, especially smartphone apps, can generate such messages. Watch for announcements next year.

Alvin
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Re: Wearable devices

Post by Alvin » Mon Jun 11, 2012 11:49 am

It is very important for Alcor members to be able to wear a device that will immediately inform Alcor whan a member dies. Otherwise all the preperation for suspension may be waisted with no hope of revival. We can't just hope that everything will work out well. W must prppare to the best of our ability for that eventuality. Some Alcor members told me that they don't need a wearable device. I guess they think that their hearts cannot stop beating.

My Pulse sells a cardiac wireless monitor. I do not know the quality of the produst. They do not offer monitoring services. I assume that it is a very small company as when I spoke to somebody fom the company about its size he was evasive about the subject. The last telephone number that I have for the company is 1 - 850 - 0635. The E - mail addresses are listed below.
http://www.mypulsemonitor.com/products/ ... nitor.html Another address is http://mypulsemonitor.com/fags.html.

There are a large number of Chinese wireless Holter Monitors for sale on E Bay. You can look them up on line.
Ther are other Chinese wireless Monitors advertised on the Internet. Just look under "Chinese Wireless Holter Monitors."

Nick Pavlica told me he is a member of Alcor and the Cryonics Institute. He is trying to get his business off the ground. It is called "Rescue Tel". He wants to use wireless Holter monitors in his service to alert Cryonic organizations when the heart stops beating. Mr. Pavlica lives in Canada, 2 blocks from the New York border.
His telephone number is 905 - 468 - 0877.

I can be contacted at E mail address - alvins387@aol.com.

Alvin
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Re: Wearable devices

Post by Alvin » Mon Jun 11, 2012 1:58 pm

The telephone number for "MY Pulse" was not transmitted correcty over the Internet. It is 1 - 850 - 668 - 0635.

bwowk
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Re: Wearable devices

Post by bwowk » Mon Jun 11, 2012 5:00 pm

I think the chances of a cardiac arrest alarm (as distinct from a distress alarm) saving a cryonicist's life are low. The reason is that outside of a hospital, EMS response to a cardiac arrest is not going to be fast enough to resuscitate anyone. This means that a cardiac arrest alarm is effectively an unexpected death alarm. Unexpected death unavoidably results in hours of warm ischemic injury, negotiations with Coroners for release, poor prospects for cryoprotective perfusion, and probable straight freezing with no cryoprotectant. The cryonics prognosis after such treatment is poor.

This doesn't mean that such monitors are of no value, but the value should not be overestimated. In my opinion, the best they can do is convert total loss to disaster and probable total loss. There is no substitute for a standby team being present at time of clinical death. Please keep Alcor informed of your health status, and leave instructions for others to do so if you are unable.

Alvin
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Re: Wearable devices

Post by Alvin » Tue Jun 12, 2012 11:27 am

Large number of people die without warning. Some die in their sleep, some in accidents, sometimes the heart stops when sitting on a chair, etc. We are all constantly vulnerable to death. At times there is considerable time lost until anything is done to stabalize the patient before Cryonic Suspension. We can only do our best. We do not know how long it takes to lose all hope of revival. We should procede on the assumption that a successful revival will be possible before giving up hope and act as though we know the final answer.

The nanocumputer will probably be necessary for a cryonics patient revival. When it is developed many say it can do in a few minutes, other say in a few seconds, what a convential computer would take 10,000 years. Some experts said that it wasn't feasable to develop the computer as the science wasn't correct or it was to complicated. Others, such as at IBM, said that it would probably take about 50 years to develop.

Now IBM and a variety of other top technologists say that it will probably be developed within 15 years. Advances take place in science and technology which suprise people because they didn't expect them. We live by paradigms. We see the world around us and try to make sense of the world. If somebody was born in 1900 they would have experienced the birth of the aircraft, X rays, radio and television, computers, a flight to the moon and back, antibiotics, nuclear energy, molecular genetics, etc. Almost nobody could have predicted these developments in 1900, including top scientists and engineers. This paradigm growth phenomena is continuing.

When a Cryonicist says that he knows the potential of science and technology to revive a suspended patient it is disturbing. It should be possible to take a Cryonically suspended brain that is damaged and break the code with Nanatechnology and Quantum Computing and whatever else is developed in the future. We must try to save our brothers and sisters from death and not say that we are sure that they can not be revived because a Cryonic Suspension Team was not at their side at the time of death.

Simple wearable devices are ok to supplement a wireless Cardiac Holter monitor. Maybe soon the same machine will be able to perform both functions.

Alvin
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Re: Wearable devices

Post by Alvin » Wed Jun 13, 2012 4:33 pm

In the above reply I used the term Nanocomputer. I actually meant Quantum computer.

Alvin

TDK
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Re: Wearable devices

Post by TDK » Fri Jun 15, 2012 6:11 pm

It really depends on the member's geographical and social situation.

If you live alone, in the middle of nowhere, then it's probably a good idea.

Imagine a member dying and not being found for several weeks.
Then indeed, chances of brain repair are minimal.

But if the member dies in their sleep of natural causes,
and the monitor alerts authorities, then at least they
will be found in a timely manner. They still might
want to do an autopsy, but at least the member
would be refrigerated, and hopefully the autopsy
could be done with an MRI for the brain. So it's
not 100% ideal, but better than a member sitting
undiscovered for several days.

But if you have a spouse around most of the time,
or co-workers, then they would probably be aware
of any unexpected death in a pretty short time.
It's still not ideal, but you can't predict all the
possible things that might happen.

I do hope that in 20 or 30 years, maybe the technology
will be there for implantable monitors, and it will be
a good way to summon emergency responders very quickly.
You still can't know if they will be willing to be supportive
of all the cryonics stuff, but at least they will be very
quick to respond. Ideally, they'd be there within minutes,
and doing CPR, etc. So even if there is no hope to revive
the person, at least blood flow is maintained, while Alcor
is contacted.

Alvin
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Re: Wearable devices

Post by Alvin » Sat Jun 16, 2012 9:41 am

Dear TDK:

Even if a member dies and thinks that a family member will call Alcor things can go wrong. An accident, fire etc. can take place and there could be a long delay until the family member is notified . It is even possible that the member and the rest of the family will be in the same accident or crime. Our motto should be hope for the best but prepare for the worst. I found that in life many unexpected things happen that we didn't expect. If we lose this fight we are really dead.

TDK
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Re: Wearable devices

Post by TDK » Mon Jun 25, 2012 8:23 pm

I just think that until the devices are implantable, people will find them to be too obtrusive.
No one wants to go around wearing a heart monitor and transmitter 24/7.
What about when you want to go to the beach, or when you are having sex?
If you take it off, or it falls off, does that set off a false alarm?
I think implantable monitors will eventually be a reality,
and an excellent tool for cryonicists. But it's not quite there yet...

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